Introductory Courses

American Studies 10 Introduction to American Studies - At Home in America

  • day and time TuTh 12:30-2:00
  • location 227 Cory
  • instructor C. Palmer & K. Moran
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 02003

Sec. 101: CC# 02006Tu 03:00-04:00, 6 Evans
Sec. 102: CC# 02009Tu 04:00-05:00, 71 Evans
Sec. 103: CC# 02012W 1:00-2:00, 81 Evans
Sec. 104: CC# 02015W 4:00-5:00, 6 Evans

Home on the range, home, sweet home, home is where the heart is, home is calling, bless our happy home, theres no place like home, my old Kentucky home, you cant go home again, Ill be home for Christmas, and Robert Frost’s claim that “Home is the place where, when you have to go there, they have to take you in.”
As a metaphor for being and belonging, HOME is central to exploring American history, politics, literature, culture, architecture, race relations, economics, folklore, and popular culture. By focusing on the American home as a place, a theory, an experience, a fantasy, and a media construct, this course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of America.

Time Courses

American Studies 101 The Birth of Consumer Society

  • day and time MW 12:00-2:00
  • location 155 Donner Lab
  • instructor K. Moran
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 02018

Sec. 101: CC# 02021M 2:00-3:00, 385 Leconte
Sec. 102: CC# 02024M 3:00-4:00, B 56 Hildebrand
Sec. 103: CC# 02027Tu 10:00-11:00, B 51 Hildebrand
Sec. 104: CC# 02030 Tu 4:00-5:00, B 56 Hildebrand

This course will examine the period beginning in the 1880s until WWI when modern consumer society emerged in the US. We will also engage the theoretical debate about the usefulness of the concept of consumerism to our understanding of modernization and modernism. Our topics will include the turn of the century worlds fairs, shopping and the rise of department stores, the emergence of mass-market catalogues and magazines and the nature of modern visual culture. Throughout the course we will examine the way advertising reflected and constructed ideas about citizenship, gender and race norms, and generational transformation in our period.

American Studies 139 AC From the Civil Rights Era to the New Gilded Age: Struggles for Racial Equality and Economic Equity from Double Victory to Occupy

  • day and time TuTh 2:00-3:30
  • location 141 McCone
  • instructor L. Cardyn
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 02056

Cross-listed as History C139C

World War II lifted the United States from the Great Depression, launching the nation on a course of economic expansion that would endure for a quarter century afterwards. This long economic boom, in turn, helped underwrite and propel efforts on behalf of greater racial and economic equality. By the late 1960s, however, as the long economic boom fizzled out, Americas march toward greater racial equality began to founder, while its march toward greater economic equality began to reverse course. The Civil Rights Era gave way to the New Gilded Age, a period marked by an increasing concentration of income and wealth in the hands of a decreasing percentage of the overall population. The course will explore the political, legal, and economic history of Americas struggles for racial equality and economic equity and the relationship between them from the World War II-inspired Double Victory campaign roots of the Civil Rights Era to the Occupy Wall Street protests of 2011 that finally brought national attention to the growing income and wealth polarization that defined the then decades-old New Gilded Age.

History 121 A American History, the Colonial Period: The Peoples and Cultures of Early America

  • day and time TuTh 12:30-2:00
  • location 101 Moffitt
  • instructor M. Peterson
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 39552

America has always been a multicultural society and perhaps at no time was this more true than in the 17th and 18th centuries. In this course, we analyse the experiences of Native, African-, and European-Americans from about the 16th century through 1763 within the framework of early modern colonization, focusing upon their conflicting and changing gender, religious, social, cultural, economic, and political systems.

Place Courses

American Studies 102 The Saloon in American Culture: Life Behind Swinging Doors

  • day and time M 3:00-6:00
  • location 7 Evans
  • instructor K. Muller
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 02036

This seminar investigates the culture of the saloon, a unique American drinking establishment that emerged in the middle of the nineteenth century only to disappear with the passage of Prohibition. We will explore the social dimensions of saloons, focusing on the multiple purposes these gathering places served, mostly for men, who came together often because of class and/or ethnic affiliation. We will also attend to women, both in- and outside the saloon, paying particular attention to their relationships to the men behind and belly up to the bar. Because saloons varied by neighborhood and region, we will examine how local and regional issues shaped saloon culture, and how saloons in turn encapsulated, protected, and advertised community identity. Finally, we will consider the representation of saloons in popular culture, most notably in twentieth-century Hollywood westerns.

American Studies 102 Hands on the Vines: The California Wine Industry

  • day and time TuTh 2:00-3:30
  • location 185 Barrows
  • instructor A. Saragoza
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 02033

Cross listed as Chicano Studies 180.

This course examines the California wine industry and the people involved in its production, emphasizing those who do the actual labor, from grape pickers and cellar masters to the vineyard managers and winemakers. The course emphasizes the period since the famous wine tasting competition between California and French wines in 1976, which marks the onset of the boom in wine consumption in the U.S. The course takes into account social and cultural trends that impact on the wine industry as well as other key attendant issues: immigrant labor, foreign competition, styles of wine making, and the multiplier effects of the industry, e.g., wine tourism. The course features field trips and guest lectures by farm workers, vineyard managers, wine makers, and winery owners.

American Studies C 112 B American Cultural Landscapes: 1900 to the Present

  • day and time TuTh 11:00-12:30
  • location 112 Wurster
  • instructor P. Groth
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 02042

Sec. 101: CC# 02045Tu 01:00-02:00, 101 Wurster
Sec. 102: CC# 02048W 12:00-01:00, 170 Wurster
Sec. 103: CC# 02051Th 10:00-11:00, 101 Wurster
Sec. 104: CC# 02054 Th 4:00-5:00, 101 Wurster
Cross listed with Geography C 160B and Environmental Design C 169B

This course introduces ways of seeing and interpreting American histories and cultures, as revealed in everyday built surroundingshomes, highways, farms, factories, stores, recreation areas, small towns, city districts, and regions. The course encourages students to read these ordinary landscapes as records of past and present social relations, and to speculate for themselves about cultural meanings. Registration for a section is required by Telebearsbut NOTE!Telebears section assignments are tentative. Final section placement will be determined by cards filled out, in person, on the first day of class. This course deals with culture, and America, but it does not deal equally with three different cultures. Thus, with our apologies, it does NOT satisfy the University’s American Cultures requirement. There are no prerequisites. You may take this B course even if you have not had the A course. People from all majors are enthusiastically welcomed.

History of Art 190 G American Architecture: The UC Berkeley Campus

  • day and time MWF 11:00-12:00
  • location 201 Giannini
  • instructor M. Lovell
  • 4 Units

This course takes as its subject the U. C. Berkeley campus as a product of many disparate visions about the nature of the institution and the role of the built environment in instruction and in envisioning a landscape of learning. Our emphasis will be on the core campus buildings, those built between 1880-1930, and especially those designed by John Galen Howard, Bernard Maybeck, and Julia Morgan. Each student will become expert on several buildings, and will serve as guide for a public campus architectural tour scheduled for April. In the final weeks of the course we will look at the additions and changes to the campus that occurred between 1930 and the present. There are no prerequisites although some knowledge of architecture will be useful.

Pre-1900 Historical Requirement

American Studies 101 The Birth of Consumer Society

  • day and time MW 12:00-2:00
  • location 155 Donner Lab
  • instructor K. Moran
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 02018

Sec. 101: CC# 02021M 2:00-3:00, 385 Leconte
Sec. 102: CC# 02024M 3:00-4:00, B 56 Hildebrand
Sec. 103: CC# 02027Tu 10:00-11:00, B 51 Hildebrand
Sec. 104: CC# 02030 Tu 4:00-5:00, B 56 Hildebrand

This course will examine the period beginning in the 1880s until WWI when modern consumer society emerged in the US. We will also engage the theoretical debate about the usefulness of the concept of consumerism to our understanding of modernization and modernism. Our topics will include the turn of the century worlds fairs, shopping and the rise of department stores, the emergence of mass-market catalogues and magazines and the nature of modern visual culture. Throughout the course we will examine the way advertising reflected and constructed ideas about citizenship, gender and race norms, and generational transformation in our period.

History 121 A American History, the Colonial Period: The Peoples and Cultures of Early America

  • day and time TuTh 12:30-2:00
  • location 101 Moffitt
  • instructor M. Peterson
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 39552

America has always been a multicultural society and perhaps at no time was this more true than in the 17th and 18th centuries. In this course, we analyse the experiences of Native, African-, and European-Americans from about the 16th century through 1763 within the framework of early modern colonization, focusing upon their conflicting and changing gender, religious, social, cultural, economic, and political systems.

Senior Thesis Seminars

American Studies 191 Senior Thesis Seminar

  • day and time Tu 2:00-4:00
  • location 7 Evans
  • instructor J. Gomer
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 02075

American Studies 191 Senior Thesis Seminar

  • day and time Th 10:00-12:00
  • location 321 Haviland
  • instructor J. Gomer
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 02069

American Studies H 195 Senior Honors Thesis Seminar

  • day and time W 10:00-12:00
  • location 2 Evans
  • instructor J. Gomer
  • 4 Units

***NOTE: In order to receive honors in American Studies, a student must have an overall GPA of 3.51, and a GPA of 3.65 for all courses taken in completion of the major (upper and lower division). Students should discuss with their major faculty adviser the preparation of a bibliography and a brief description of their proposed honors thesis and their eligibility to enroll in honors, based on GPA, the semester before they plan to enroll in H195. They also must secure a faculty adviser from an appropriate field who will agree to direct the honors thesis (the “honors thesis adviser”). THE FACULTY ADVISERS AGREEMENT MUST BE SUBMITTED TO COURSE INSTRUCTOR NO LATER THAN THE 2ND WEEK OF CLASSES.

Honors Seminar

American Studies H 110 The Secret History of America

  • day and time W 3:00-6:00
  • location 203 Wheeler
  • instructor M. Cohen
  • 4 Units

Americans have long fought over the meaning of our past. Some of these historical debates grow out of conflicting interpretations of controversial events, such as why did we drop the Atomic Bomb, who invented Punk Rock, why are we so economically unequal? But some of these debates still hinge of basic factual matters, like did George Washington really chop down that cherry tree? Or, did Thomas Jefferson really have sex with his female slaves? Who shot JFK? Working through the popular trope of the secret history of America, this seminar takes up the question of contested historical knowledge and why some events become markers of national identity, why some stories are forgotten, why some historical knowledge remains buried in archives, while still others parts of our past are gone forever, reclaimed only through art and fiction. Readings include historical works by Michel-Rolph Trouillot, Louis Adamic, Richard Hofstadter, Jill Lepore and Tom Engelhardt; as well as novels by Don DeLillo, Thomas Pynchon, Toni Morrison and Ishmael Reed.

Special Courses of Interest

African American Studies 139 History of American City Twinning Business

  • day and time W 2:00-5:00
  • location 182 Dwinelle
  • instructor M. Laguerre
  • Class # 00631

This course examines the formation, development, and functioning of sister-cities in the United States in their relations to African, Caribbean, and other sister-cities; how the links between them are sustained; the role they play in the production of global metropolitan policies; the sister-churches/sister-congregations they may engender; the social, economic, and political impact they have on society. It discusses their influence in shaping transnational migration, foreign policy, and international trade and focuses on the transfer of wealth, knowledge, goods, technical skills, and expertise from one city to another. It additionally explains how sister-cities evolve into different configurations whether they are located in the global North or global South. The course further assesses the role of digitization in the maintenance and strengthening of linkages between sister-cities.

American Studies C 172 History of American Business

  • day and time MW 11:00-12:30
  • location C 230 Cheit
  • instructor C. Rosen
  • 3 Units
  • Class # 02057

Cross-listed as UGBA C172

UGBA-AS C 172 is an undergraduate elective in the history of American business. It covers an amazing history of creative innovation, growth, structural change, challenge, trouble, travail and more growth, more innovation, challenge, and trouble. Less than two hundred years ago, the U.S. was just starting to transform itself from a country of farmers and village craftsmen into a nation based on large scale, mechanized, corporate controlled industry. Today it is an industrial colossus dominated by huge multinational corporations that operate in markets around the world, as well as tiny start-ups hoping to disrupt the whole business system.

At every stage of development, business managers have struggled to deal with an ever-evolving array of problems, challenges, and opportunities. They have had to manage operations, find economic opportunities, and politically maneuver in a marketplace that was being constantly shaped and reshaped by technological innovation and financial change, recessions, depressions, and bubbles, the rise of new markets, and changes in government policy.

Today’s richly paid corporate managers are struggling with their own problems, challenges, and opportunities. These include the rise of new media and technological innovation, new forms of marketing, new forms of financial, economic, social and environmental regulation and deregulation, and the rise of dynamic competitors in China, India, Brazil, and other parts of the developing world as well as the ever-insistent demands from the investor community that they grow their profits every quarter, quarter after quarter, year after year.

The purpose of UGBA-AS 172 is to challenge students think through these issues, past and present. How has American business gotten to where it is today? How can historical insight help us understand the strategic, organizational, geo-political, economic, social, and environmental challenges facing todays global business managers? We will explore the parallels and the differences between current and past developments in business evolution in order to develop deeper understanding of the nature of management problem solving, technological and organizational innovation, and business-government interaction, as well as businesss impact on American culture and society.

History 100 D American Lives, American History: Oral History and the Understanding of Social Change

  • day and time TuTh 12:30-2:00
  • location TBA
  • instructor R. Candida-Smith
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 40098

This course provides an introduction to oral history as a research method generating primary sources with distinctive information about the past. Primary and secondary readings will help students explore the potential of oral history interviews to augment historical understanding, with focus on how social change marks the lives of those it touches, as reflected in the stories they are willing to share. We will examine the ways in which memory and identity are continually changing responses to historic events and processes that are always simultaneously personal and collective. Students will receive training in preparation, conduct, and analysis of interviews. Students will conduct a short interview for the course and write a brief analysis of what they learned and what the record might contribute to historical understanding.