Introductory Courses

African American Studies 10 Lives of Struggle: Minorities in a Majority Culture

  • day and time TTh 12:30-2
  • location Hearst Field Annex A1
  • instructor L. Raiford
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 20432

Section 101 Class #: 25871 Th 11-2, 385 LeConte
Section 102 Class #: 25890 Th 3-4, 30 Wheeler
Section 103 Class #: 25891 Th 4-5, 104 Wheeler
Section 104 Class #: 25892 - Th 4-5, 104 Barrows
Section 105 Class #: 25893 - W 11-2, 175 Barrows
Section 106 Class #: 25894 W 12-1, 185 Barrows
Section 107 Class #: 25895 - W 3-4, Dwinelle 235
Section 108 Class #: 25896 - W 3-4, 118 Barrows

The purpose of this course is to examine the many forms that the struggle of minorities can assume. The focus is on individual struggle and its outcome as reported and perceived by the individuals themselves. Members of three minority aggregates are considered: African Americans, Asian Americans (so called), and Chicano/Latino Americans. The choice of these three has to do with the different histories of members of these aggregrates. Such differences have produced somewhat different approaches to struggle.

American Studies 10 Introduction to American Studies: Everyday America

  • day and time TTh 12:30-2
  • location 2060 VLSB
  • instructor C. Palmer
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 24244

Section 1 - M 2-3, 245 Hearst Gym
Section 2 - T 11-12, 245 Hearst Gym
Section 3 - Th 11-12, 245 Hearst Gym
Section 1 - W 4-5, 245 Hearst Gym

This course will examine significant aspects of the everyday and the ordinary in American life. Through the analysis of multiple forms–from front porches to closets, from board games to playgrounds, from the remembered South to the end of the world, from the mixtape to the music video–this course provides an introduction to and a toolkit for the interdisciplinary study of American Culture.
Building on concepts and methods of inquiry which define American Studies, this course will emphasize analyzing cultural meaning, knowledge, and values through the examination of a variety of cultural situations and productions–including the values, patterns of behavior, and even objects that most of us take for granted–in order to explore how individuals, groups, and institutions interact through the different ways they give meaning to experience. Through close reading of diverse texts, we will work towards developing an approach that enables us to analyze critically the process involved in the ongoing creation, maintenance and transmission of cultural meaning in American society. A students goal in this course is to learn close reading, critical thinking, and writing skills that will enable them to be self-conscious and thoughtful investigator of American culture.

Time Courses

American Studies 101 The Teen Age

  • day and time MW 10-12
  • location 131 Campbell
  • instructor C. Palmer
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 24246

This course explores both the invention of the teenager and the significance of teen culture in the United States after the Second World War. Among the topics addressed in the course will be identity, age-sets, social networks and high school hierarchy, juvenile delinquency, the concept of cool, consumerism, representation, and teen idols. We will examine a variety of teen texts drawn from film, television, music, narrative and graphic fiction, and social engineering textbooks. Our task in this class is to figure out how people have represented and responded to teenagers in the United States. How has the American teenager been understood and commercialized? What has been the cultural impact of the American teenager? How do people explain social fascination with high school, the senior prom, adolescent angst, teen fashions, and youth culture? What metaphors have been most often attached to the teenager in the United States? How does American adolescence prescribe as well as challenge American adulthood? How has the American teenager been made exciting, appealing, dangerous, or everyday? By studying the experiences, culture, and representation of American teenagers, and the cultural forms created for them and by them, we will consider specific moments of meaning-making and the long-term development of generational discourse.

American Studies 101 The Birth of Consumer Society

  • day and time MW 4-6
  • location 106 Etcheverry
  • instructor K. Moran
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 20444

This course will examine the period beginning in the 1880s until WWI when modern consumer society emerged in the US. We will also engage the theoretical debate about the usefulness of the concept of consumerism to our understanding of modernization and modernism. Our topics will include the turn of the century worlds fairs, shopping and the rise of department stores, the emergence of mass-market catalogues and magazines and the nature of modern visual culture. Throughout the course we will examine the way advertising reflected and constructed ideas about citizenship, gender and race norms, and generational transformation in our period.

History of Art 190 G The Transatlantic Gilded Age and Its Discontents

  • day and time TTh 12:30 - 2:00
  • location 106 Moffitt
  • instructor M. Lovell
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 32602

Section 102 Th 4-5, 104 Moffitt
Section 103 Th 5-6, 104 Moffitt

This course considers the linked arts of the United States, England, and France in the period between 1865 and 1918 looking at specific case study artists, structures, social movements, and literary works. We will focus on the arts and institutions endorsed by the wealthy and, equally, works of art and literature designed to critique and correct the architecture, manners, and activities of the era’s transatlantic elite.

Place Courses

American Studies 102 The City of Angels

  • day and time TTh 3:30-5
  • location 2 LeConte
  • instructor K. Moran
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 32310

In this course we will examine “Los Angeles” from a number of disciplinary perspectives. We will begin with Los Angeles as a geographical space and the issue of reading maps as representations and communication. We will also discuss Los Angeles as a political and cultural space defined by various race, ethnic and class relationships. And we will primarily think about LA as product of media– both a city of sunshine and a city of noir in film, novels, TV, ads, and tourism promotions. We will end the course with a virtual tour (readings, etc.) about Disneyland and Orange County.

American Studies 102 Hands on the Vines: The California Wine Industry

  • day and time TuTh 2-3:30
  • location 12 Haviland
  • instructor A. Saragoza
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 25771

This course examines the California wine industry and the people involved in its production, emphasizing those who do the actual labor, from grape pickers and cellar masters to the vineyard managers and winemakers. The course emphasizes the period since the famous wine tasting competition between California and French wines in 1976, which marks the onset of the boom in wine consumption in the U.S. The course takes into account social and cultural trends that impact on the wine industry as well as other key attendant issues: immigrant labor, foreign competition, styles of wine making, and the multiplier effects of the industry, e.g., wine tourism. The course features field trips and guest lectures by farm workers, vineyard managers, wine makers, and winery owners.

American Studies C 171 The American Designed Landscape since 1850

  • day and time TTh 2-330
  • location 191 Wurster
  • instructor M. Owens
  • 3 Units
  • Class # 20498

Cross-listed with Landscape Architecture C171

This course surveys the history of American landscape architecture since 1850 including the rise of the public parks movement, the development of park systems, the establishment of the national parks, the landscape of the Progressive Era, suburbs, and the modernist landscape. The survey encompasses urban open spaces, conservation landscapes, urban design, environmental planning, and gardens. It reviews the cultural and social contexts which have shaped and informed landscape architecture in the United States since the advent of the public parks movement, as well as the aesthetic precepts, environmental concerns, horticultural practices, and technological innovations of American landscapes.

Pre-1900 Historical Requirement

American Studies 101 The Birth of Consumer Society

  • day and time MW 4-6
  • location 106 Etcheverry
  • instructor K. Moran
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 20444

This course will examine the period beginning in the 1880s until WWI when modern consumer society emerged in the US. We will also engage the theoretical debate about the usefulness of the concept of consumerism to our understanding of modernization and modernism. Our topics will include the turn of the century worlds fairs, shopping and the rise of department stores, the emergence of mass-market catalogues and magazines and the nature of modern visual culture. Throughout the course we will examine the way advertising reflected and constructed ideas about citizenship, gender and race norms, and generational transformation in our period.

History of Art 190 G The Transatlantic Gilded Age and Its Discontents

  • day and time TTh 12:30 - 2:00
  • location 106 Moffitt
  • instructor M. Lovell
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 32602

Section 102 Th 4-5, 104 Moffitt
Section 103 Th 5-6, 104 Moffitt

This course considers the linked arts of the United States, England, and France in the period between 1865 and 1918 looking at specific case study artists, structures, social movements, and literary works. We will focus on the arts and institutions endorsed by the wealthy and, equally, works of art and literature designed to critique and correct the architecture, manners, and activities of the era’s transatlantic elite.

Senior Thesis Seminars

American Studies 191 Senior Thesis Seminar

  • day and time M 4-6
  • location 262 Dwinelle
  • instructor C. Palmer / R. Syka
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 15234

American Studies 191 Senior Thesis Seminar

  • day and time Th 2-4
  • location 45 Evans
  • instructor C. Palmer
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 15233

Special Courses of Interest

American Studies C 152 Native American Literature

  • day and time MW 12-2
  • location 223 Dwinelle
  • instructor B. Piatote
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 15231

Cross-listed with Native American Studies C152

An analysis of the written and oral tradition developed by Native Americans. Emphasis will be placed on a multifaceted approach (aesthetic, linguistic, psychological, historical, and cultural) in examining American Indian literature.

History 100 D Calculating Americans

  • day and time TTh 11-12:30
  • location 170 Barrows
  • instructor C. Rosenthal
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 31137

Section 101 W 8-9, 251 Dwinelle
Section 102 W 9-10, 106 Wheeler

The data we collect both reflects our values and shapes them, constraining and defining the questions we ask about our society. This course will use a series of case studies from the history of American data to examine a wide array of political, economic, and cultural issues. We will explore the ways that categories, units of analysis, and practices of instruction and collection both reflect and reshape assumptions about race, gender, labor, and household structure. We will also experiment with the many ways we can use quantitative documents to learn about the pastboth through close reading and through aggregation and statistical analysis. Case studies will be drawn from the colonial period to the present.

History 125 B African-American History, 1861-1980

  • day and time TTh 2-3:30
  • location 170 Barrows
  • instructor W. Martin
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 31142

Section 101 W 8-9, 254 Dwinelle
Section 102 - W 9-10, 2030 Valley Life Sciences

This course will examine the history of African Americans and ethno-racial relations from the Civil War and Emancipation (1861-1865) to the modern African American Freedom Struggle (1954-1972). Social, cultural, economic, and political developments will be emphasized. Topics to be covered include: Black Reconstruction; black life and labor in the New South; leadership; class; gender; Jim Crow