Introductory Courses

African American Studies 27 AC Lives of Struggle: Minorities in Majority Culture

  • day and time TTh 12:30-2
  • location 145 Dwinelle
  • instructor M. Cohen
  • 3 Units
  • Class # 32726

Please see Schedule of Classes for discussion sections

IN FALL 2016, THIS COURSE SATISFIES THE AMERICAN STUDIES 10 REQUIREMENT. The purpose of this course is to examine the many forms that the struggle of minorities can assume. The focus is on individual struggle and its outcome as reported and perceived by the individuals themselves. Members of three minority aggregates are considered: African Americans, Asian Americans (so called), and Chicano/Latino Americans. The choice of these three has to do with the different histories of members of these aggregrates. Such differences have produced somewhat different approaches to struggle.

American Studies 10 Introduction to American Studies: America at Play

  • day and time MW 2-4
  • location 390 Hearst Min
  • instructor C. Palmer
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 32135

Sec. 201 - TBA
Sec. 202 - TBA

This course will introduce students to the interdisciplinary study of American culture, taking play as its central focus. We will look at the historical, political, economic, and cultural meanings of leisure and recreation in the U.S. Specific topics will include: theme parks, hobbies, tourism, vacationing, sports, games, gambling, fandom, the playground movement, holidays, shopping, nightlife, and the relationship between work and play.

American Studies 10 America at Play

  • day and time MW 2-4
  • location 390 Hearst Mining
  • instructor C. Palmer
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 32135

Sec. 202 - M 5-6, 104 Barrows
Sec. 203 - M 12-1.110 Barker

This course will introduce students to the interdisciplinary study of American culture, taking play as its central focus. We will look at the historical, political, economic, and cultural meanings of leisure and recreation in the U.S. Specific topics will include: toys, theme parks, hobbies, tourism and vacationing, sports and games, the playground movement, holidays, and the relationship between work and play.

Letters and Science 20 E Edible Stories: Representing California Food Culture

  • day and time MW 2-4
  • location 2 Le Conte
  • instructor K. Moran
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 32726

Sec. 101: M 9-10, 75 Evans
Sec. 102: M 10-11, 87 Evans
Sec. 103: M 12-1, 2070 VLSB
Sec 104 W 11-12, 138 Morgan

IN FALL 2016, THIS COURSE SATISFIES THE AMERICAN STUDIES 10 REQUIREMENT. Focusing on California writers and artists, this course will include a wide range of food related texts and images in order to explore the relationship between representation, interpretation and cultural identity. Students will examine fiction, film, photography, food memoirs, paintings, advertising, cookbooks and television to help them think critically about issues of form, medium and audience. Assignments will help students develop humanities skills such as writing personal essays, doing cultural close readings, analyzing literary and visual representations, and organizing and writing materials and web designs that contribute to larger conversations about California, food and representation.

Time Courses

American Studies 101 The Birth of Consumerism

  • day and time TTh 3-5:30pm
  • location 3106 Etcheverry
  • instructor K. Moran
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 32144

This course will examine the period beginning in the 1880s until WWI, when modern consumer society emerged in the US. We will also engage the theoretical debate about the usefulness of the concept of consumerism to a contemporary understanding of the politics of consumption as a modernizing force. Our topics will include the turn of the century worlds fairs, shopping, toys, and the rise of department stores, as well as the emergence of mass-market catalogues and magazines. We will also examine the way the advertising reflected and constructed ideas about citizenship, gender and race norms, and generational transformation in our period. ***This course also satisfies the pre-1900 historical requirement for American Studies majors.

American Studies 101 The New Gilded Age

  • day and time M 2-5
  • location 115 Kroeber
  • instructor M. Brilliant
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 32978

The new Gilded Age is a term that scholars, pundits, and activists in recent years have used to refer to the sharp increase in economic inequality in the United States, the increasing concentration of income and wealth in the hands of the nations well-to-do, especially its richest 1 percent and above. The roots of this watershed in recent American history are many and run deep. This course will trace some of those roots, examining the origins of Americas new Gilded Age by focusing on major transformations in economics, politics, and education in the 1970s and 1980s. Along the way, we will also consider some of the social experiences and cultural expressions of Americans as they lived through the new Gilded Age.

American Studies 101 New Gilded Age

  • day and time MW 2-5
  • location 115 Kroeber
  • instructor M. Brilliant
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 32978

The new Gilded Age is a term that scholars, pundits, and activists in recent years have used to refer to the sharp increase in economic inequality in the United States, the increasing concentration of income and wealth in the hands of the nations well-to-do, especially its richest 1 percent and above. The roots of this watershed in recent American history are many and run deep. This course will trace some of those roots, examining the origins of Americas new Gilded Age by focusing on major transformations in economics, politics, and education in the 1970s and 1980s. Along the way, we will also consider some of the social experiences and cultural expressions of Americans as they lived through the new Gilded Age.

American Studies 101 The Teen Age

  • day and time TTh 11-12:30
  • location NEW LOCATION AS OF 9/1/16: 145 Moffitt
  • instructor C. Palmer
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 12481

This course explores both the invention of the teenager and the significance of teen culture in the United States after the Second World War. Among the topics addressed in the course will be identity, age-sets, social networks and high school hierarchy, juvenile delinquency, the concept of cool, consumerism, representation, teen idols, and the rise of tweens. We will examine a variety of teen texts drawn from film, television, music, narrative and graphic fiction, and social engineering textbooks. Our task in this class is to figure out how people have represented and responded to teenagers in the United States. How has the American teenager been understood and commercialized? What has been the cultural impact of the American teenager? How do people explain social fascination with high school, the senior prom, adolescent angst, teen fashions, and youth culture? What metaphors have been most often attached to the teenager in the United States? How does American adolescence prescribe as well as challenge American adulthood? How has the American teenager been made exciting, appealing, dangerous, or everyday? By studying the experiences, culture, and representation of American teenagers, and the cultural forms created for them and by them, we will consider specific moments of meaning-making and the long-term development of generational discourse.

Place Courses

American Studies 102 The Suburbs

  • day and time TTh 2-3:30
  • location 155 Kroeber
  • instructor J. Gomer
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 02024

Cross-listed as Chicano Studies 180

This course is about the American suburb as a place in the geographical, social, political, and cultural landscape of the United States. While our course will move historically through the 19th and 20th century, we will also focus on the representations of suburban life in fiction and film. Additionally, we will examine the material culture of the suburbs. To that end, each student will adopt a suburb and produce an original research profile of a Bay Area suburban community.
By the end of our course, students will have a complex understanding of how the process of suburbanization occurred both nationwide and more specifically in areas like Orange County, Atlanta, Charlotte and Oakland; what the rise of the suburbs has meant for American electoral politics and racial equality; how fiction writers and Hollywood filmmakers have represented the nature of suburban life; and what Bay Area suburbs look and feel like today. Ultimately, our goal in this course is to begin to develop a nuanced understanding of the suburbs as a place in American life. This course satisfies the place requirement for the American Studies major.

American Studies 102 Detecting California

  • day and time TTh 12:30-2
  • location 155 Kroeber
  • instructor R. Huston
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 12502

The characteristics of specific urban places including their cultural history, racial and ethnic politics, climate, and geography are often critical elements in detective narratives. In this course, we will discuss modern detective novels, films and television to think about two California urban placesLos Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area. Our texts will include foundational classics by Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett, as well as the work of contemporary crime writers who exploit the hard-boiled formula to explore California history, culture and politics from the perspective of women, African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Asian Americans. Films will include The Maltese Falcon, The Big Sleep, Chinatown and Chan is Missing.

Pre-1900 Historical Requirement

American Studies 101 The Birth of Consumerism

  • day and time TTh 3-5:30pm
  • location 3106 Etcheverry
  • instructor K. Moran
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 32144

This course will examine the period beginning in the 1880s until WWI, when modern consumer society emerged in the US. We will also engage the theoretical debate about the usefulness of the concept of consumerism to a contemporary understanding of the politics of consumption as a modernizing force. Our topics will include the turn of the century worlds fairs, shopping, toys, and the rise of department stores, as well as the emergence of mass-market catalogues and magazines. We will also examine the way the advertising reflected and constructed ideas about citizenship, gender and race norms, and generational transformation in our period. ***This course also satisfies the pre-1900 historical requirement for American Studies majors.

Senior Thesis Seminars

American Studies 190 Senior Thesis Seminar

  • day and time TBA
  • location TBA
  • instructor C. Palmer
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 12554

American Studies 191 Senior Thesis Seminar

  • day and time Th 2-4
  • location 214 Haviland
  • instructor K. Moran. /C. Covey
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 12565

American Studies H 195 Senior Honors Thesis Seminar

  • day and time W 2-4
  • location 65 Evans
  • instructor C. Palmer
  • 4 Units

***NOTE: In order to receive honors in American Studies, a student must have an overall GPA of 3.51, and a GPA of 3.65 for all courses taken in completion of the major (upper and lower division). Students should discuss with their major faculty adviser the preparation of a bibliography and a brief description of their proposed honors thesis and their eligibility to enroll in honors, based on GPA, the semester before they plan to enroll in H195. They also must secure a faculty adviser from an appropriate field who will agree to direct the honors thesis (the “honors thesis adviser”). THE FACULTY ADVISERS AGREEMENT MUST BE SUBMITTED TO COURSE INSTRUCTOR NO LATER THAN THE 2ND WEEK OF CLASSES.

Honors Seminar

American Studies H 110 Honors Seminar

  • day and time W 3-6
  • location 214 Haviland
  • instructor M. Cohen
  • 3 Units

Who writes the secret history of America? Working between history and power, this seminar takes up the question of contested historical and political knowledge. This year’s seminar is going to focus on the 2016 Presidential campaign and the election season more broadly. We will spend part of our time reading books, following the news cycle, and most importantly, collaborating with Medium.com to produce a collection of on-line writing about what promises to be the most contentious and consequential election since the 1930s (if not 1860 but lets hope not). Students will be expected to write and publish, in collaboration with your classmates, two short essays available to the general reading public through Medium.com. One piece of political commentary on the election (or electoral politics more generally) and the other on this history and politics of an object, image or text. Readings include The Iron Heel by Jack London, It Can’t Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis, Gold Fame Citrus by Claire Vaya Watkins, Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler, Memory of Fire: Genesis by Eduardo Galeano and A History of Bombing by Sven Lindqvist. Enrollment is by instructor permission only.

Special Courses of Interest

American Studies C 134 Information, Technology, and Society

  • day and time M 2-6
  • location 155 Kroeber
  • instructor M. Laguerre
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 12568

Cross-listed with African American Studies C134

This course assesses the role of information technology in the digitization of society and focuses on the deployment of e-government, globalization of e-commerce, telecommuting practices in Silicon Valley, organization of the virtual office, racial and gender ramifications of the digital divide, geography of cyberspace, and privacy, security, and surveillance. It examines how IT has contributed to the mobility of agents, tools, and social structure. It discusses the role of IT in the governance and transformation of the American metropolis with a specific focus on the social production of digital neighborhoods and networked homes. It explains the phenomenon of virtual migration, the rise of digital diasporas, and how IT is a conduit through which the globalization process is deployed.

American Studies C 152 Native American Literature

  • day and time TTh 12:30-2
  • location 587 Barrows
  • instructor E. Lima
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 12580

Cross-listed with Native American Studies C152

An analysis of the written and oral tradition developed by Native Americans. Emphasis will be placed on a multifaceted approach (aesthetic, linguistic, psychological, historical, and cultural) in examining American Indian literature.

English 174 The Seventies

  • day and time TTh 3-5:30pm
  • location 254 Dwinelle
  • instructor S. Saul
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 31883

As one historian has quipped, it was the worst of times, it was the worst of times. The 70s routinely come in for mockery: even at the time, it was known as the decade when it seemed like nothing happened.” Yet we can see now that the 70s was a time of cultural renaissance. It gave us the New Hollywood of Scorcese, Coppola and others; the music of funk, disco, punk and New Wave; the postmodern comedy of Saturday Night Live and the postmodern drama of Sam Shepard and others; and a great range of literary fiction written by authors from Ursula LeGuin and Margaret Atwood to Toni Morrison and Maxine Hong Kingston. It was also a period of intense political realignments the moment the United States was roiled by the oil crisis, the fall of Nixon and the fall of Saigon; by the advent of womens liberation, gay liberation, and environmentalism as mass grassroots movements; and by the rise of the Sunbelt and the dawning of the conservative revolution. In this class, we will consider “the seventies” in full, surveying developments in the spheres of both politics and culture. NOTE: At this point there are no seats in this course for American Studies students. Please keep checking the online schedule if interested in taking the course.

History 139 C Civil Rights and Social Movements in the U.S.

  • day and time TTh 3-5:30pm
  • location 159 GSPP
  • instructor W. Martin
  • 4 Units

Civil Rights and Social Movements in U.S. History presents a top-down (political and legal history), bottom-up (social and cultural history), and comparative (by race and ethnicity as well as region) view of America’s struggles for racial equality from roughly World War II until the present. Beginning with the onset of World War II, America experienced not a singular, unitary Civil Rights Movement as is typically portrayed in standard textbook accounts and the collective memory but rather a variety of contemporaneous civil rights and their related social movements. These movements, moreover, did not follow a tidy chronological-geographic trajectory from South to North to West, nor were their participants merely black and white. Instead, from their inception, America’s civil rights movements unfolded both beyond the South and beyond black and white. “;Civil Rights and Social Movements in U.S. History”; endeavors to equip students with a greater appreciation for the complexity of America’s civil rights and social movements history, a complexity that neither a black / white nor nonwhite / white framework adequately captures. Put another way, “;Civil Rights and Social Movements in U.S. History”; will examine how the problem of the color line which W.E.B. DuBois deemed to be in 1903 the problem of the twentieth century might better be viewed as a problem of color lines. If America’s demographics are increasingly beyond black and white, if “;the classic American dilemma has now become many dilemmas of race and ethnicity,”; as President Clinton put it in the late 1990s, if color lines now loom as the problem of the 21st century, then a course on America’s civil rights and social movements past may very well offer a glimpse into America’s civil rights and social movements present and future.

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International and Area Studies 158 AC Social Movements, Urban History, and the Politics of Memory

  • day and time TTh 5-6:30
  • location 174 Barrows
  • instructor S. Burns
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 32294

Cross-listed with PACS 148AC

Civil Rights and Social Movements in U.S. History presents a top-down (political and legal history), bottom-up (social and cultural history), and comparative (by race and ethnicity as well as region) view of America’s struggles for racial equality from roughly World War II until the present. Beginning with the onset of World War II, America experienced not a singular, unitary Civil Rights Movement as is typically portrayed in standard textbook accounts and the collective memory but rather a variety of contemporaneous civil rights and their related social movements. These movements, moreover, did not follow a tidy chronological-geographic trajectory from South to North to West, nor were their participants merely black and white. Instead, from their inception, America’s civil rights movements unfolded both beyond the South and beyond black and white. “;Civil Rights and Social Movements in U.S. History”; endeavors to equip students with a greater appreciation for the complexity of America’s civil rights and social movements history, a complexity that neither a black / white nor nonwhite / white framework adequately captures. Put another way, “;Civil Rights and Social Movements in U.S. History”; will examine how the problem of the color line which W.E.B. DuBois deemed to be in 1903 the problem of the twentieth century might better be viewed as a problem of color lines. If America’s demographics are increasingly beyond black and white, if “;the classic American dilemma has now become many dilemmas of race and ethnicity,”; as President Clinton put it in the late 1990s, if color lines now loom as the problem of the 21st century, then a course on America’s civil rights and social movements past may very well offer a glimpse into America’s civil rights and social movements present and future.

.

Music 137 A Music of the Civil Rights Era

  • day and time TTh 9:30-11 am
  • location 125 Morrison
  • instructor T. Roberts
  • 4 Units
  • Class # 33308

Section 101 - W 2-3, 128 Morrison
Section 102- - W4-5, 128 Morrison

The decades of the mid-20th century were an explosion of political unrest, social change, and cultural innovation. While the world was rocked by numerous anti-colonial struggles, disenfranchised populations in the U.S. forged their own battles in what is commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Era. In this course, we engage musicboth as a record and agent of change as a way to understand this broader history. We explore a wide variety of music from this period, including African American freedom songs, soul, jazz, and funk; the multiracial folk revival; Asian American jazz and taiko; and various Latino styles. In what ways did these social movements employ culture as a political tool? How was music used to express discontent and look toward a better future? In order to address these questions and more, we will engage readings on music, politics, history, and identity. We will also view, listen, and perform the traditions we study. Ultimately, while the tale of the Civil Rights Era is often told as separate, compartmentalized racial/ethnic struggles, our investigations will reveal the intense interracial and intercultural political solidarities and musical dialogues that took place.

Music C 138 Art and Activism

  • day and time TBA
  • location TBA
  • instructor T. Roberts
  • 4 Units
  • Class # TBA

This course explores the intersections between aesthetic practice and social change. Students will investigatein both theory and practicethe capacity of art making to cultivate transformation of themselves, their relationships, their practices, their institutions, and the larger economic and socio-political structures in which they function, locally and globally. Focusing on historical and contemporary artists and political issues, we ask: (1) How is art impacted by social change? (2) How has art been used toward social change? and (3) How can we, as course participants, use art to bring about social change? Rooted in interdisciplinary scholarship, students will engage theoretical debates and historical analyses regarding the role of the arts in social change and examine the particular capacities of the arts to negotiate across and between cultures, languages, and power-laden lines of difference. Taking a broad view of activism, we will consider the ways in which artistic practices foster radical imaginations that can expand our sense of the possible. Case studies will span media including visual arts, theater, dance, poetry/spoken word, literature, and music.